Weidmannsheil Knives

Weidmannsheil Knives – Wilhelm Weltersbach

Founded in 1882 in Solingen, Germany, Wilhelm Weltersbach produced a diverse line of quality made pocket knives and fixed blade knives for the German and European market. Calling his brand “Weidmannsheil” which translates from the German as “good hunting.”

Weltersbach used both a Stag head’s shield and a Boar head’s shield as it’s logos.

At last, all the Weltersbach cutlers had died by 1991 and all out put of knives had stopped by 1994. In 1997 the Friedrich Olbertz cutlery firm help James F. Parker of Tennessee acquire the rights to the name Weidmannsheil and the knives were once again being produced by the Olbertz Cutlery Company in Solingen, Germany for Parker Cutlery.

Friedrich Olbertz Cutlery was founded in 1872, in Solingen, the famous city of blades in Germany. The company is managed by the fifth generation of family and produces many famous brands such as “Weidmannsheil,” “Bulldog Brand,” “Fight’n Rooster,” and “Carl Schlieper” to name a few.

Weidmannsheil 2

http://www.sonorandesertknives.com/weidmannsheil.html

Published in: on April 21, 2015 at 11:39 pm  Leave a Comment  
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What is a Blood Groove For?

Blood groove
This question comes up every 8 months or so. The blood groove on a knife probably is derived from the channel present on swords, where it is called a “fuller”. There are some persistent myths floating around about the function of blood grooves, from “releases the vacuum when the knife is thrust into a person” to “no functional use, purely decorative”. Let’s talk about these wrong answers first, before we talk about the right answers.

Wrong Answer #1: Releasing the Body Suction

Basically, this theory postulates that the blood groove is present to facilitate withdrawing the knife from a person/animal. In this scenario, it is said that the animal’s muscles contract around the knife blade, and that this causes a vacuum, which makes the knife difficult to withdraw. But on a knife with a blood groove, blood runs through the blood groove and breaks the suction, so the knife can be withdrawn with less difficulty.

One problem is that there’s no evidence that this suction ever really happens. Also, over and over again people report that there is no difference whatsoever in the difficulty of withdrawing a knife with a blood groove vs. one without. This is one theory that has been tested and found wanting.

Yes, I realize you may have heard this myth from your deadly knife instructor, or read it in a book somewhere. But the experts agree that it is false. If your knife can cut its way in, it can just as easily cut its way out, with or without a blood groove.

And with that, I am going to change terminology from “blood groove” to “fuller”, since we all now know the so-called “blood groove” is not playing a blood-channeling function.

Wrong Answer #2: Purely Decorative

There is a grain of truth to this one. Although a fuller does play a functional role, on a short knife the effect might be so small as to be insignificant. Many believe the fuller plays a strictly decorative role on knives or swords under 2 feet long. As the knife or sword gets bigger, the fuller plays an increasingly important role. On smaller knives, it is indeed probably just decorative.

Right Answers:

Okay, so what substantive role does the blood groove/fuller play? The bottom line is, it does two things:

1. It stiffens the blade 2. It lightens the blade

That first statement has been the subject of some controversy, with some people sending me equations purporting to show that the removal of material cannot make the blade stiffer. I will table for now the question of “does the blade get stiffer, in some absolute sense, due to the fuller?” Rather, I’ll weaken the claim to say that the blade *feels* stiffer to the user who is waving it around — because it’s stiffer for its weight.

I’ll reproduce a post by Jim Hrisoulas which lays things out clearly (re-printed with permission):

When you fuller a blade you do several things:

1: You lighten it by using less material, as the act of forging in the fuller actually widens the blade, so you use less material than you would if you forged an unfullered blade. (In stock removal the blade would also be lighter, as you would be removing the material instead of leaving it there).

2: You stiffen the blade. In an unfullered blade, you only have a “single” center spine. This is especially true in terms of the flattened diamond cross section common to most unfullered double- edged blades. This cross section would be rather “whippy” on a blade that is close to three feet long. Fullering produces two “spines” on the blade, one on each side of the fuller where the edge bevels come in contact with the fuller. This stiffens the blade, and the difference between a non-fullered blade and a fullered one is quite remarkable.

Fullers on knives do the same thing, although on a smaller blade the effects are not as easily seen or felt. Actually looking at fullers from an engineering point of view they really are a sophisticated forging technique, and it was the fullered swordblade that pointed the way to modern “I” beam construction.

When combined with proper distal tapers, proper heat treating and tempering, a fullered blade will, without a doubt, be anywhere from 20% to 35% lighter than a non-fullered blade without any sacrifice of strength or blade integrity.

Fullers were not “blood grooves” or there to “break the suction” or for some other grisly purpose. They served a very important structural function. That’s all. I have spent the last 27 years studying this and I can prove it beyond any doubt…

Article Written by: Joe Talmadge

Source:  rec.knives Newsgroup May 1998

Published in: on April 21, 2015 at 5:07 am  Leave a Comment  
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Extrema Ratio Knives

Logo

Extrema Ratio, located in Prato, Italy, has been designing, manufacturing and selling high performance combat knives since 1997 enjoying a reputation for excellence that is unsurpassed in the military and tactical knife industry.

Extrema Ratio serves military and law enforcement communities as well as commercial markets and the knives are well known and sought after all over the globe.

The company prides itself in design, material and quality to deliver a high end product that meets the most severe mil-standards.

EXRRAO-BLK

The production based on modern cutting edge technology is combined with traditional craftsmanship and the result is the pinnacle of this synthesis. The Extrema Ratio design team uses the 3D system to design new models and create prototypes. Each knife design is then meticulously inspected and then field tested. At this point the finest materials are chosen for durability, function and beauty. Each knife is then hand assembled and hand finished and inspected by Extrema Ratio team of craftsmen.

Each knife that is manufactured at Extrema Ratio has measured up to the Company rigorous standards for quality and performance. The knives are the result of painstaking research and development. This is an Extrema Ratio hallmark. Extrema Ratio knives represent a real, solid value for the money.

All of the knives are made from N690 Cobalt Stainless Steel which is a steel from a small plant in Austria, often used in the manufacture of surgical instruments. This steel along with their tempering methods produce a steel of great strength, flexibility with the capability to take and retain a razor sharp edge. The handles provided on the fixed blade knives are made from a grip polymer called Forprene which provides a very sure and comfortable grip even when wet. The folding range of knives have a shell made from a super strong anticorodal alloy and the best materials are used throughout to ensure reliability and longevity.

Dark Talon

If you want a knife that will hold up under extreme conditions, then take a look at Extrema Ratio Knives

6 Hunting Knives by Jeff Morgan

California knife maker Jeff Morgan makes a no-nonsense hunting knife. Made of 1095 high carbon steel. His knives are bought by hunters, cattlemen, farmers, ranchers the world over. The really great thing about his knives is that you can have a hand made custom working knife that will last for years for right around $100.00.

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Click on the photos for more info

A Visit with Rick Genovese

An hour and a half North East of Phoenix, nestled between the Tonto National Forrest and Roosevelt lake, in the shadow of the Sierra Ancha range with part of the Mogollon Rim on the the northeast and the Mazatzal Mountains westward, you’ll find Tonto Basin and Rick Genovese, master knife maker.

(According to an NPR story on the Lone Ranger, Tonto Basin is the inspiration for Tonto, the native American companion to the Lone Ranger.)

I took the hour and half drive up to Tonto Basin to meet Rick in person and to see his work. Rick was a very gracious host, inviting me into his home and giving me a tour of his shop as well as showing me some of the knives he had recently completed.

I first met Rick on Facebook after seeing a post of one of his outstanding knives which was engraved by Mitch Moschetti

rick genovese

I thought, “Wow! Who is this guy?” After a little research, I became his Facebook friend which lead me to today’s travels. I arrived at his home a little after 10am and we spent the next two hours talking.

Rick grew up in Phoenix and worked in his dad’s business as a machinist. Of course working with tools led him to begin making knives in 1975. His first knives where in the style of Bob Loveless, (who doesn’t start there?). It wasn’t long after he began his hand at making folders. From there he stepped up his game and began working his framed folders with gem stone materials such as fossilized Mammoth, Jade, petrified woods and his favorite (as well as mine) Mother of Pearl.

"Dolores Dagger"

“Dolores Dagger”

"Dolores Dagger"  Featuring Kevin Casey Feather Damascus blade and Picture Jasper inlays.

“Dolores Dagger” Featuring Kevin Casey Feather Damascus blade and Picture Jasper inlays.

Gent's Folder

Gent’s Folder

Gent's Folder

Gent’s Folder

Gent's Folder

Gent’s Folder

Gent's Folder  Pearl & Opal inlays each side, 18k Gold toothpick, engraving by Mitch Moschetti in leaf pattern with 24k Gold border

Gent’s Folder
Pearl & Opal inlays each side, 18k Gold toothpick, engraving by Mitch Moschetti in leaf pattern with 24k Gold border

Gent's Folder  White Pearl with Lapis Lazuli ovals

Gent’s Folder
White Pearl with Lapis Lazuli ovals

Gent's Folder

Gent’s Folder

Gent's Folder

Gent’s Folder

His own favorite knife model is the “Sleek Dagger” style folder

Rick holding his "Sleek Dagger" folder

Rick holding his “Sleek Dagger” folder

"Sleek Dagger" folder

“Sleek Dagger” folder

"Sleek Dagger" folder

“Sleek Dagger” folder

His most popular knife style is his Gent’s folder which he makes in three different sizes

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Rick still makes a fixed blade now and then. Here’s one he is currently working on

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Rick’s shop is currently in a storage unit until he moves to his new home

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The first thing you notice about his shop is how immaculately clean he keeps it, every tool has it’s place. A bit crowded, it still has plenty of room for Rick to produce the fine art knives he makes. Though his knives sell in the thousands of dollars with buyers all over the world he is far from pretentious.

His knife making mentors include makers such as Ron Lake, Steve Hoel and his Japanese Sensei, Kuzan Oda whom he met in Colorado. The story he told was Kuzan Oda had recently left working with Bob Loveless and was looking for a place to make knives. Rick had a shop he allowed him to use in trade for knife making lessons and tips.

For this lover of knives it was a good trip.

If you’re interested in acquiring one of Rick’s beautiful knives, you can simply email him at genoveseknives (at) hotmail (dot) com.

On the road north

On the road north

View from Rick's back yard

View from Rick’s back yard

Quiet beauty

Quiet beauty

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Tonto National Forest

Tonto National Forest

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Best Survival Knife Guide: Top Knives Reviews + Expert Tips

Last One Alive Blog did a nice review on survival knives and what to look for in purchasing them. You can read it here:

http://lastonealive.com/best-survival-knife/

Published in: on January 6, 2015 at 7:53 am  Leave a Comment  
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More Randy Lee Knives

I’ve added four more of Randy Lee’s Knives to the website. These are some beautiful knives by Randy.

California Buckeye Skinner

California Buckeye Skinner

Ironwood Drop point Hunter

Ironwood Drop point Hunter

G-10 Stealth Skimmer

G-10 Stealth Skimmer

Sheep Horn Slender hunter

Sheep Horn Slender hunter

What Knife Should a Prepper Carry

What Knife Should a Prepper Carry

by Leopold Lacrimosa

I was asked by a group of preppers to write a short article on what kind of blades should one carry in time of need. After giving it much thought, I’ve come to the conclusion that if SHTF time you should be prepared by carrying several different knives on your person.

Let’s look at the ones I would and do carry. First off, deep down in my pocket I have a traditional 2 blade pocket knife. Now the one I use has beautiful Mother of Pearl scales on it. I pull it out to use, I don’t get the dirty “why is he carrying a weapon” look for these social minded liberals. Rather I get the “Ooh, that’s a pretty knife!” instead. But if I think I’m going to be needing it in a bit stronger situation, I switch it out with a 3 blade stockman pattern knife with stag scales. This way I don’t have to worry about damaging the MoP scales. One of these knives are always on my person. They’re not big knives but are able to do most daily cutting jobs I come across due to the variety of blades. Style wise, size and blade count are all a matter of personal choice. Remember the lager the knife the heaver it sits in your pocket. Usually, a Jack knife has one blade while a Trapper has two. Stockmans are known for three blades and a Congress has four. On this knife, a modest $60- $100 should get you a good knife.

3 Bladed Stockman

3 Bladed Stockman

I almost always have a top quality Tactical knife clipped to the inside of my pants pocket. (I take it off when I go into buildings like schools and such and leave it in the car til I get back.) This should be a mid-size knife with a blade about 3.5” – 4” in length. It should be of good quality steel, no less than 0.14” thick blade. The handle should fit in the hand comfortably. Since my hands are different than everyone else I can only recommend you pick up the knife you are interested in and hold it in your hand. The handle material should be tough such as Macarta or G-10 not wood or bone, both which can chip or splinter under duress. The blade locking mechanism needs to be strong. I suggest you forgo a liner lock unless there is a built in secondary lock you can engage. Back locks are usually the strongest though I’ve seen some truly strong rolling locks. Though automatics and auto assist knives are cool and fun, you’ll have a piece of junk when the spring breaks. In this range of knife you should be spending $150-$300 range.

Viper Free

Viper Free

The next knife you should have is a fine fixed blade multipurpose knife. When I say multipurpose, I talking about a knife to do a multitude of jobs from daily camping chores, to heavy cutting to even defending yourself with. The knife should be of the best quality carbon steel and make. The blade should be 6” – 8” long. It should be a straight edge. The spine should be 1/4” thick with a full tang. The handle should be solid material. Stag is ok in this because of the thickness usually used in a handle of this size. You got to remember it worked well for the deer or elk for many years. Mammoth tooth is strong but it adds a lot to the price of a knife. A guard is recommended. Even a double guard. I personally recommend a clip point Bowie knife. Good for use in skinning an animal yet large enough to fight with. Intimidation helps when in a fight and a Bowie is high in that factor. For this I prefer a custom handmade knife over a factory model not to say there are not some good fixed blades out there that are factory made. You must certainly go with reputation in the case of who is going to make it for you. Price range should be $200 – $500. Anything priced over that and I want to put it on a shelf for display purposes only.

Bowie Knife

Bowie Knife

If you carry a secondary fixed blade knife then I would suggest a double edge dagger. A dagger has one purpose and one purpose only. Smaller than a Bowie it can be used in your other hand in conjunction to your Bowie.

Dagger

Dagger

Last but not least, everyone needs a good quality hatchet for general chopping work. It will help save the edge on your knife. Remember, I said hatchet not an ax. A hatchet is intended for light chopping, such as small limbs or bushes while an ax, depending upon the head size can be used for for chopping jobs of all sizes, and some ax heads are even double-bitted to increase the work interval between sharpening. The main difference is weight and size. A hatchet you can carry without to much problem but I’d hate to have to lug an ax around all day especially if I need a hand free for a rifle or gun.

Hatchet

Hatchet

The last knife I recommend but it is not necessary to have is a machete. Great to have if your into surviving in the jungle but remember, if your name is not Danny Trejo or you’re not planing on trekking through the wilderness, there is a lot of other equipment you may need to carry instead. This is optional not mandatory.

Danny Trejo - Machete Kills

Danny Trejo – Machete Kills

There you have it. Recommendations of what knives to carry by a knife guy.

Published in: on November 4, 2014 at 9:52 am  Leave a Comment  
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Ka-Bar Collector’s Club Knives

In 1975 As part of its efforts to revive the company, Ka-Bar establishes a special Collector’s Division. Its purpose is to produce significant and commemorative knives, to recreate famous antique Ka-Bar knives and actively support the development and enjoyment of knife collecting in genereal.

The first knife is produced by the newly formed Collectors Club was a full dress version of the USMC Fighting/Utility knife, produced in limited number in 1976.

All the Collector’s Club knives were produced here in the U.S. even though many of Ka-Bar’s production had moved overseas since the early 70’s.

The company is currently not offering any traditional pocket knives and the Ka-Bar Collector’s Club became inactive in 2006.

The following knives are available for purchase on our website here:

Dog Head Trapper

Dog Head Trapper

Gun Stock Trapper

Gun Stock Trapper

Coke Bottle Jack

Coke Bottle Jack

Large Stag Dog Head Trapper

Large Stag Dog Head Trapper

Large MoP Swell Center Jack

Large MoP Swell Center Jack

Large Genuine Ivory Swell Center Jack

Large Genuine Ivory Swell Center Jack

Triplets

Triplets

Italian Made Knives

Italy has a tradition of making pocket knives going back to ancient times. The oldest surviving pocket knives date back to the Roman era. Perhaps it is where pocket folding knives originated.

 

When most people think of Italian knives, what comes to mind is the famous Stiletto Switchblades first made popular in the 1961 film, West Side Story.

Italian Stiletto

Italian Stiletto

 

Authentic Italian Switchblade Knives from Italy are all hand crafted and made by skilled Italian switchblade knife makers in the Italian town of Maniago by the oldest Switchblade knife makers in the business in the same way they have been made for decades.

 

Maniago founded in 981 is a town and comune located in the Province of Pordenone, Friuli-Venezia Giulia (north-eastern Italy) in the Italian Alps. It is famous all over the world for its production of knives and of all kinds of cutting tools: the beginning of the history of the blacksmiths from Maniago can be dated back to 1453. Since then Maniago has given birth to hundreds of blacksmiths and knife makers and today is the seat of the District of Cutlery Works, made up of nine municipalities of the area, which employs about a thousand workers in the production cycle of cutting tools only and is the second industrial centre in the province of Pordenone.

 

Italian cutlery, for example, is very unique in it’s craftsmanship and design. Modern knife makers of Italy are producing fascinating “cross-over” designs combining aspects of older cutlery with new materials and forward thinking designs. Of course this synthesis of the old into the new is not limited to any particular region or country. If we look at the history of knife making in the United States, or any country, we see a very similar progression.

 

Coming out of Italy though are some fantastic knives. Companies like Extrema Ratio, Viper, Fox, Lion Steel and Maserin (to name a few) are making knives that strong, sharp, well built and desirable. This not to say they are better than US made knives as I think some of the best knives are still made in the US. But the quality of Italian knives are definitely there. Many American cutlery companies know this are having knives made in Italy. Companies like DPx, Hogue, Ontario, TOPS, Fox-N-Hound, Spyderco and others are having their designs produced there and importing them back here for sale.

 

I myself carry an Italian Viper knife as my EDC. This after years of carrying a USA made blade.

 

Viper Free

Viper Free

 

If you are thinking about investing in a quality blade, one that you would be proud to carry and not afraid to use on a daily basis, Italian knives are an option you should consider.

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