How to Sharpen your Knife

KNIFE SHARPENING DOS AND DON’TS

Never sharpen your knife on a power-driven grinding wheel. You could burn the temper from your blade making the edge brittle and prone to chips or cracks. This also voids the warranty.

A SHARPENING STONE IS THE KEY TO A SHARP KNIFE

To really sharpen a flat blade knife well, use a sharpening stone. Check out our excellent selection of fine and coarse grit sharpeners. Always sharpen with a wet stone. For touch-ups use a fine grit stone. If the blade is really dull, use the coarse grit stone first, then switch to a fine grit stone.

Diamond Stone Sharpeners

Made of metal or a composite base, diamond stone sharpeners have an outer layer of micron-sized diamonds bonded to a metal surface. Many have special surface holes to prevent “filling build-up.”

Diamond stones are fast, effective and come in different grits. You can use a diamond stone wet or dry, but we recommend wet. Use water or water-based honing oil, not petroleum-based oil.

Natural Sharpening Stones

Arkansas Washita natural stones are genuine silica “Novaculite” from Arkansas. The different grits and abrasive qualities make excellent sharpening stones.

Natural sharpening stones can be used wet or dry. We recommend using them wet. Water, water-based honing oil or petroleum-based honing oil work best. Keep in mind using oil on a natural stone is a commitment. It’s difficult if not impossible to switch back to water.

Don’t be stingy with the honing fluid during sharpening. Use enough to keep a pool visible on the stone. Once murky, pat or lightly wipe away the fluid, then add more.

Tapered and Pocket Sharpeners

Serrated blades, gut hooks and fishhooks require a different type of sharpener. Check out Buck’s selection of tapered and pocket sharpeners. They are fully up to the job.

HOW TO CLEAN AND CARE FOR YOUR SHARPENING STONE

Use a little extra fluid to clean and dry the sharpener after every use. Store carefully. Glossy grey streaks are a good indicator of debris build-up. Clean the sharpener thoroughly.

  • If using water or water-based honing oil, clean with soapy water.
  • If using petroleum-based honing oil, use the same oil or kerosene.
  • To scrub clean, use your finger or an old toothbrush.
  • Do not drop your sharpener. Being made of stone, it may break or chip.

SHARPENING FLUID

Depending on the sharpening stone, you can use water, water-based honing oil and petroleum-based honing oil. Treat your choice of sharpening fluid as a permanent one; because of the porous nature of the stone itself, it is very difficult to switch from an oil-based lubricant.

We suggest sharpening on a wet stone because it cleans the pores of the sharpener dissipates frictional heat and facilitates smooth sharpening action.

 

From the Buck Knife Website

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Published in: on April 24, 2014 at 12:43 am  Leave a Comment  
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