Knives from the Copper State Cutlery Knife Show

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Copper State Cutlery Association Knife Show Dec 17-18, 2016

What a great time I had at the CSCA Knife Show last weekend. Here’s a look at some of the knife makers that were there:

Daniel Collett Collett Knives

Daniel Collett
Collett Knives

Robert Pangina Glendale, AZ

Robert Pangina
Glendale, AZ

Coy Knives by Coy Show Low, Az

Coy
Knives by Coy
Show Low, Az

Glen Glen's Custom Knives San Tan Valley, Az

Bob Ham, Payson AZ

 

Lee Beene - Lee's Cutlery Mesa, AZ

Lee Beene – Lee’s Cutlery
Mesa, AZ

Dan Zvonek New River, Az

Dan Zvonek
New River, Az

Charles Turnage Fine Turnage Production San Antonio, Tx

Charles Turnage
Fine Turnage Production
San Antonio, Tx

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Jeff Stover Torrance, Ca

Matt Shindel - representing his brother Mike work - Blade & Hammer California

Matt Shindel – representing his brother Mike work – Blade & Hammer
California

John Brown - Show Organizer

John Brown – Show Organizer

Daniel Stucky Springfield, Or

Daniel Stucky
Springfield, Or

Bob Ham Payson, Az

Tom & Linda Buckner
Olympia, Wa

Rob Saniscalchi RSK Knifeworks Phoenix, Az

Rob Saniscalchi
RSK Knifeworks
Phoenix, Az

K&G Finishing Supplies Lakeside, AZ

K&G Finishing Supplies
Lakeside, AZ

Randy Lee St. Johns, AZ

Randy Lee
St. Johns, AZ

Charles Prokopp Tucson, AZ

Charles Prokopp
Tucson, AZ

Steve Godfrey Godfrey Knife and Forge Phoenix, Az

Steve Godfrey
Godfrey Knife and Forge
Phoenix, Az

Clayton Cowart Sugarloaf Knifeworks Phoenix, AZ Forged in Fire S3 E7

Clayton Cowart
Sugarloaf Knifeworks
Phoenix, AZ
Forged in Fire S3 E7

Ed Turner Low Country Knifeworks Casa Grande, Az

Ed Turner
Low Country Knifeworks
Casa Grande, Az

Ray Kirk - Raker Knives Tahlequah, OK Forging Demo Forged in Fire S1 E8

Ray Kirk – Raker Knives
Tahlequah, OK
Forging Demo
Forged in Fire S1 E8

Ray Kirk - Raker Knives Forging Demo Forged in Fire S1 E8

Ray Kirk – Raker Knives
Forging Demo
Forged in Fire S1 E8

Ray Kirk - Raker Knives Forging Demo Forged in Fire S1 E8

Ray Kirk – Raker Knives
Forging Demo
Forged in Fire S1 E8

Ray Kirk - Raker Knives Forging Demo Forged in Fire S1 E8

Ray Kirk – Raker Knives
Forging Demo
Forged in Fire S1 E8

Rich Greenwood - Pokabu Forge. Forged in Fire S3 E1

Rich Greenwood – Pokabu Forge.
Forged in Fire S3 E1

Konstantin Vasenko Russian Made Knives Irvine, Ca

Konstantin Vasenko
Russian Made Knives
Irvine, Ca

(Not shown KC Gray)

More photos on Lee Beene’s blog:

http://arizonaknifenews.com

Let’s Talk Autos

Got some fine automatic knives in and posted them up on the website.

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http://www.sonorandesertknives.com/automatic-knives-creations–akc-.html

http://www.sonorandesertknives.com/buck-knives.html

http://www.sonorandesertknives.com/puma-knife-company.html

Impressive Frank Centofante Ivory Lockback Hunter w/Scrimshaw

This beautiful knife has just been listed on our website

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The beautiful Scrimshaw work was done by celebrated artist Bob Burdette

More photos and information can be found on our website here: Frank Centofante

Marc Larsen Bowie Knife

Marc Larsen was a very talented knife maker from Camp Verde, Arizona. He learned most of his craft from Tim Hancock. He forged his own steel and Damascus. Now in his late 70’s, he’s pretty much retired from knife making. Here is an excellent example of the knives he produced:

 

Straight Back Damascus Bowie Knife

IMG_3871 IMG_3872 IMG_3873 IMG_3874 IMG_3875 IMG_3876 IMG_3877 IMG_3878 IMG_3879 IMG_3880

Click here to purchase this knife

The History of George Wostenholm

The History of George Wostenholm

Along with Joseph Rodgers, George Wostenholm is possibly the most famous name in cutlery. These two, once great rival companies have sat alongside each other in The Egginton Group since 1986. Perhaps more than any other cutlery company, the history of Wostenholm is steeped in folklore.

Although Wostenholm was reputably formed in 1785, it took three generations and one name change for the company to really make a mark in Sheffield’s cutlery history. Originally the family name was spelt ‘Wolstenholme’ but, story has it that George Wostenholm the second found this name too long for smaller knives so he omitted the letters ‘l’ and ‘e’. The name has been spelt Wostenholm ever since. The second George Wostenholm also built the Rockingham Works (known locally as the Rockingham Wheel) in around 1810. Knives made in this factory and marked “Rockingham Works” are highly prized by knife collectors to this day.

In 1831, the famous I*XL trademark, which had first been registered in 1787, was assigned to Wostenholm.

It was the third George Wostenholm who ensured that this trademark became arguably the world’s most illustrious and best loved knife brand.

An ambitious industrialist and fiercely determined salesman, he came to the company’s helm in 1833. The company had already taken its first steps into the American export market as early as 1830; however, it was the third George who made numerous gruelling sales trips to America. This was at a time when the trans-Atlantic passage would take many weeks. Demand from America for superior quality cutlery was growing and George Wostenholm’s efforts had made certain that the finest cutlery of the time, his I*XL knives, were the knife of choice for Americans.

Trade flourished and in 1848 a new factory, the fabled Washington Works on Sheffield’s Wellington Street, was opened.

As the popularity of Wostenholm’s knives grew, so too did Washington Works and it soon became nearly four times its original size, employing over 800 workers.

Wostenholm was now making knives in a volume never witnessed before. It is important to note though that George ensured that quality was never sacrificed and knives continued to be made by the finest cutlers using only the best materials. For the Great Exhibition of 1851, to demonstrate the height of their craft, Wostenholm made three exquisite hunting knives from designs by noted English artist Alfred Stevens.

George Wostenholm, after having reportedly declined the position on a number of previous occasions, finally became Master Cutler 1856. He also held the office of Justice of the Peace for Sheffield. His influence on the city of Sheffield was considerable. He purchased an entire suburb of 150 acres and designing the streets to be laid out to reflect the leafy residential roads of the villages he had visited in New York State. The Sheffield road names of Wostenholm Road and Washington Road as well as Wostenholm’s huge house Kenwood Hall (now a hotel) are lasting reminders of his impact on the city.

Wostenholm’s influence on history was also felt across the Atlantic. Wostenholm had begun making hunting knives in the 1830’s.

Many of these were exported to America to keep up with demand for highly crafted knives in this incredibly turbulent time in American history.

There are two claims made about Wostenholm and the relationship with one of America’s most famous sons, legendary frontiersman Colonel James Bowie. The first claim is that Bowie ordered knives for himself and his close friends directly from Wostenholm.

The second, more famous claim is that, on March 6th 1836 when Bowie died at The Alamo while General Santa Anna’s Mexican Army attacked, a knife found on his body was one made by Wostenholms. Whether or not these stories are true is impossible to say for certain as company records from that period no longer exist, but it is nice to imagine that the paths of these two great men once crossed.

What can be said for certain is that Wostenholm’s dedication to his company and its products meant that the I*XL trademark has come to be regarded as the absolute pinnacle in knife manufacture.

Originally Published by http://www.eggintongroup.co.uk

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Published in: on February 8, 2014 at 7:57 am  Leave a Comment  
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