Legends of Knifemaking: Paul Fox

Jesse Paul Fox Jr, known by his middle name Paul, was a long-time member of the Knifemakers’ Guild and owner of Pioneer Woodcarving. As Fox’s friend and fellow maker Tim Britton noted on The Knife Network, “Paul may have been one of the most creative knifemakers of all time. He was perhaps best known for his electric-motor-driven folder and a series of very fancy knives that were a lot like sculpture. He won the W.W. Cronk Award at the Knifemakers’ Guild shows till they asked him to stop entering and let someone else win.

Paul-Fox

Paul Fox 1938 – 2012

According to Britton, Fox had a great sense of humor. “Paul had a Chevy Suburban that he bought at a North Carolina State Surplus auction for $700,” Tim recalled. “It was ugly, yellow and very beat up.  He took it to Hendricks Motors of NASCAR fame and had them put a full race motor in it.  Damned thing would fly and Paul loved nothing better than challenging redneck racers and usually beating them. Guess you have figured out by now, that dude was a character!

“Paul was very much at home with locals—guys from the garage, bread-truck drivers, etc. He was one of a kind, like so many of us in knifemaking. I can still see Paul using the remote control boat to chase geese off his pond!”

– See more at: http://www.blademag.com/featured/knifemaker-paul-fox-dies#sthash.pOlrVOOm.dpuf

 

See his available knives here

Advertisements

Legends of Knife Making: Corbet Sigman

Corbet Sigman was born 8 March 1932, in Putnam, W.V. and lived there all his life until passing 5 Aug 2005.

corbet r sigman 7

Corbet was a master of all aspects of making fixed blade knives. A member of the Knife Makers Guild when it was in it’s infancy. When one of his peers had a technical problem or question, it was Corbet to whom they turned. When the Dutchman,. Frans van den Heuvel wanted to learn American cutlery techniques, it was Corbet Sigman he contacted. When American Blade published the book How to Make Knives, 182 pages – step by step process – photo illustrated. They asked the masters of their time, I.E…Bob Loveless, Bill Moran, and many others each to contribute a chapter of the step by step process. Corbet was responsible for the chapter on blade polishing.

He was authentic, genuine, humble and modest. He gave freely his knowledge of knife making to anyone who asked. Those character traits is what made Corbet a gaint amoung his peers with their deepest respect for him.

IMG_5029

http://www.sonorandesertknives.com/corbet-sigman.html