Cody Wescott Knives

I’ve added 3 of Cody Wescott knives to the website.

Cody Wescott of Las Cruces, New Mexico sold his first knife in 1982 and is a full time maker at least he was in 1995 according to the 1995 annual edition of Knives, his knives where priced from $80 to some up to $950. back in 1995, he offered engraving and made his own sheaths.

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More information and to purchase these knives can be found here

Russell Klingbeil Knife

Russell Klingbeil died in January 2004. He was a member of the USMC. An avid surfer and weight lifter. He was an accomplished designer and engineer of fire-sprinkler systems. He was very much into Harley Davidson motorcycles. Remarkably talented at drafting, he was also very good at drawing, often things that would make me laugh and my aunt smack him on the arm. He was an outdoors-man who camped and was an aficionado of the rugged mountain-man lifestyle of yesteryear. He was a black-powder rifleman as well as an accomplished knife-maker.

Here is a Spear Point Boot Knife he made. there were 67 of these made between November 1998 and January 1999. This one is numbered 001.

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His knives are sought after by collectors and rarely come on the market.

More photos and information here.

Vintage Microtech Damascus MUDT

This M-UDT is considered to be of the Vintage era of Microtech.  The side opening automatic action of this knife is flawless and the overall aesthetics is in near mint condition. The handle has a rubber insert for grip, a lanyard hole, and a pocket clip on the back.

Dimensions
Overall Length:  6.2 inches
Blade Length:  2.5 inches
Blade Steel:  Damascus
Blade Stye:  Single edge partially serrated
Function:  Side opening push button automatic
Pocket Clip:  Yes
Lanyard Hole:  Yes

Priced to sell at $475.00 

Contact me if interested at leopold@SonoranDesertKnives.com

An Hour With Greg Medford

I pulled up to a 15,000 square foot manufacturing facility on the North West side of Phoenix just off the interstate after having called ahead. I had a customer who wanted the top of the line MKT Praetorian Ti knife.

Praetorian T Drop Point

I had to order one so why not take a trip across town and do it in person.

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Walking into the place I was greeted by Greg’s two children who were very friendly and then his wife Amy. She asked me to wait a moment and disappeared down to hall to return a few minutes later and issued me into Greg’s office where I got to meet the man himself. Not the first time, as I had met him three years ago at the Atlanta Blade Show. Like there, Greg greeted me with a powerful handshake as if I was a long unseen friend.

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After pleasantries, Greg took time out from his busy schedule to tour his plant and explain each step of the process on how his knives are made. Greg said it simply, “He uses modern technology to make hand made knives.” With 20 employees working for him, his knives are made by hand. Each and every one. He looks at his manufacturing of his knives as a modern day Henry Ford building the Model T.

They use only US made steel for all of his knives. They make all the screws, hardware and clips in house. The only machining done on his knives are the drilling of the holes. The most impressive part of the his knives is that each one is totally ground by hand, free style. Put together by hand. A Kydex sheath is made for the fixed blade knives, (Soon they will be going to all leather sheaths), and then they are given a final detailed inspection before being shipped out in their own pelican case.

He showed me how not only are his knives are extremely sharp for cutting, but they will also take punishment of being used as a pry-bar. Something I hardly recommend using a knife for.

Besides knives, we talked about other interest we have in common. Namely, Massachusetts, Martial Arts and Military Service. Both our families have ties to Mass. Greg’s from Western Mass and mine from Boston proper. Greg had studied and taught martial arts for years in Arizona before turning to manufacturing earning several black belts. Also he served his county in Kuwait with the 5th Marines during Desert Storm. The hall of his offices are lined with photos and memorabilia of all the American wars from the Revolution through Iraq and Afghanistan.

Over all, the president / owner took time out of his day for me a regular guy. Turning me back over to Amy, he went back to work and I got my customer’s knife ordered and headed home.  Thank you Greg!

Medford Knives at SDK

Mike Tamboli: Master of the Miniatures

For those who aren’t familiar with Arizona custom knifemaker, Mike Tamboli or his knives, then you’ve been missing out on a great resource for collectible miniature knives.

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Mike, who has been making knives since the early 70’s specializes in making miniature knives. His miniature fantasy knives are sought after by collectors around the world. Over the years he and his knives have been written about in many knife magazines and periodicals.

 

Mike says as much effort goes into making a quality miniature knife as it does a regular sized knife.

But Mike is not just known for his miniatures. He also makes outstanding fixed blades and folders too.

Now’s your chance to pick up and own one of Mike’s miniatures or regular sized folders newly listed at SonoranDesertKnives.com

Legends of Knife Making: Corbet Sigman

Corbet Sigman was born 8 March 1932, in Putnam, W.V. and lived there all his life until passing 5 Aug 2005.

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Corbet was a master of all aspects of making fixed blade knives. A member of the Knife Makers Guild when it was in it’s infancy. When one of his peers had a technical problem or question, it was Corbet to whom they turned. When the Dutchman,. Frans van den Heuvel wanted to learn American cutlery techniques, it was Corbet Sigman he contacted. When American Blade published the book How to Make Knives, 182 pages – step by step process – photo illustrated. They asked the masters of their time, I.E…Bob Loveless, Bill Moran, and many others each to contribute a chapter of the step by step process. Corbet was responsible for the chapter on blade polishing.

He was authentic, genuine, humble and modest. He gave freely his knowledge of knife making to anyone who asked. Those character traits is what made Corbet a gaint amoung his peers with their deepest respect for him.

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http://www.sonorandesertknives.com/corbet-sigman.html

Hans Weinmueller Wharncliff Folder

Blade: Wharncliff

1/2 Stop

Blade Steel:

Blade Length: 2 3/4″

Bolster: 410 SS

Handle: Dyed Bone

Closed Length: 3 1/2″

Liners: 410 SS

Hans Weinmuller Knives

Crawdaddy Forge Knives

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Mark Adams has sent me a dozen of his knives to list for him. They are now up on the website. Mark is a relatively new knife maker who lives in Greenville, TX. after moving there from Louisiana, thus the name Crawdaddy Forge. His knives are made from Nicholas files, rasps and O-1 tool steel. All of his knives are made completely with hand tools only. No giant power hammer, water jet cutter, computer laser do-hickey.

He has already begun to create a following of customers who collect his knives for everyday use including hunting, camping and all around ranch use.

To see a listing of all Crawdaddy Forge knives please click here.

If you are wondering if file knives are any good? Read knife expert Bernard Levine’s article here.

One of Howard Viele’s First Knives

Double Edge Slip Knife

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Purchase it here: Howard Viele

2015 Best Business of Scottsdale

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Sonoran Desert Knives has been selected as the 2015 Best Business of Scottsdale in the category of Outdoor Gear.

The Scottsdale Best Businesses Program is an annual program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Scottsdale area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

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Published in: on December 3, 2015 at 9:05 pm  Comments (1)  
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