Stan Shaw Engraved Pen Knife

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Stan Shaw has been making knives by hand for over 75 years. Now 90 years old, he still works in his shop two days a week making knives the traditional way, by hand. “My knives are completely processed by hand, from sawing out the blades, springs and linings, to the finished product,” he says.

Trained under Ted Osbourne, Stan learned to make multi-bladed knives using expensive materials, such as mother of pearl, tortoiseshell and ivory. As the cutlery industry declined Stan learned how to do many of the jobs that would make a knife, such as forging, grinding and hafting. Traditionally these tasks were separate subdivisions of the cutlery trade, carried out by single person. This meant that many different cutlers were involved in the making of one knife. Stan Shaw is unique because he can make a knife from start to finish on his own.

In 1983, Stan went off on his own after working for such Sheffield greats as George Wostenholm, John Watts and John Clarke. In 2009 he moved his tools and workshop to the Kelham Island Museum. Stan has a waiting list of four years for his knives, which are highly prized by collectors.

You can see more photos and information of the above pocket knife on the website

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New Article Published at SonoranDesertknives.com

One of the most well know Sheffield trade marks I*XL.
Most collectors are familiar with the cutlery made by George Wostenholm. The company was originally listed as “George Wolstenholme and Son”, the name was shorted before about 1820.

They acquired the I*XL trade mark in 1826.

Any knife bearing the I*XL trade mark must be assumed to have been made after 1826

Two early markings found on fixed blade/folding bowie knives are

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